The payment industry is full of acronyms and jargon - making some things sound much more complicated than it should. We've included below a summary of the most-used jargon, and its meanings.

AVS – Address Verification System
A security method used for Customer Not Present keyed transactions to help reduce fraud. This
method confirms the house number and numbers from the postcode of the cardholder’s registered
address. (Not applicable on international cards.)


Batch
The store of transaction totals in the terminal.

Broadband
Internet. Broadband systems are typified by being always connected and having faster connection
speeds than dial-up. The most popular kinds of broadband include ADSL (Asymmetric Digital
Subscriber Line) and Cable.


CVV2
Card Security Code (also known as CVV, CV2, CVC, CVVC and CSC). This is usually used for keyed
transactions to reduce fraud. The CVV2 code is a 3 digit number found on the signature stripe, or for
American Express, a four digit code on the front of the card.


Cashback or PWCB
A value-add service which allows you to debit a cardholder’s debit card and hand over the equivalent
value in cash.

Dial backup
The ability of a terminal to revert to the dial mode of communication in the event of an IP/Ethernet
connection being unavailable.


DHCP – Dynamic Host Control Protocol
A system where IP Addresses are assigned to networked equipment automatically.

DSL filter
A device that improves the quality of an ADSL (broadband) enabled telephone line by separating
data and voice signal frequencies.

End-of-day banking/settlement
The procedure whereby the terminal checks the totals it has stored in its Batch with the totals stored
at your acquirer.

Ethernet
A standard used to physically connect devices together. Networking protocols such as IP can be used
over Ethernet connected equipment.


GPRS – General Packet Radio Service
This is a method of communicating data via the mobile phone network.


IP – Internet Protocol
A method whereby data is transmitted over networks such as the Internet (may also be expressed as
TCP/IP).


IP address
A number represented in the form XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX which identifies a device on the Internet (for
example: 193.129.71.130). These numbers are the networking equivalent of telephone numbers.


MAC address – Media Access Control address
An individual address given to every piece, of Ethernet networking equipment. This address is always
marked on Spire Payments equipment containing such an address. Do not confuse with Message
Authentication Certificate: a certificate used in the UKCA Standard 70 message protocol.


MID – Merchant Identification
A 7-16 digit number assigned by your bank to identify a merchant. Often abbreviated to MID.
Additional card schemes may have separate MIDs.

PABX – Private Automatic Branch eXchange.
Usually found as part of a larger telephone system, requiring the user to press a number on their
telephone to make an external call.

PCI DSS Compliance

Payment Card Industry compliances proves as a business you are not storing customer card data. You're either PCI DSS non-compliant or compliant. DSS stands for Data Security Standards (usually it's shortened to just PCI).


PIN – Personal Identification Number
This is usually a 4-digit number entered at the point of sale to validate the cardholder.

TCP port
A number representing a service at a particular IP address


Terminal ID (TID)
A unique number assigned to each terminal.


UKCA – UK Cards Association
The organisation defining the rules and standard for the operation of most Point of Sales equipment
in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Formerly known as Association for Payment Clearing Services
(APACS).

Wi-Fi access point
A device that allows a Wi-Fi terminal to connect to a host or acquirer. The access point can
communicate with an external network either via dial or network communications.


Wi-Fi
A wireless method of short range communication usually found in handheld devices.

Many businesses aren’t aware of the need to be PCI complaint until you spot the fines on your terminal bill.

PCI Compliance - what’s this? Have you seen on your terminal bill a charge for either being PCI compliant / non complaint?

What does it mean?

Payment card industry (PCI) compliance is mandated by credit card companies to help ensure the security of credit card transactions in the payments industry. In short, it means as a business that you aren’t storing any customers card details.

Do you need it?

Any merchant that wants to process, store or transmit credit card data is required to be PCI compliant, according to the PCI Compliance Security Standard Council.

What’s the rules?

Here are the 12 requirements to become compliant:

1. USE AND MAINTAIN FIREWALLS

2. PROPER PASSWORD PROTECTIONS

3. PROTECT CARDHOLDER DATA

4. ENCRYPT TRANSMITTED DATA

5. USE AND MAINTAIN ANTI-VIRUS

6. PROPERLY UPDATED SOFTWARE

7. RESTRICT DATA ACCESS

8. UNIQUE IDS FOR ACCESS

9. RESTRICT PHYSICAL ACCESS

10. CREATE AND MAINTAIN ACCESS LOGS

11. SCAN AND TEST FOR VULNERABILITIES

12. DOCUMENT POLICIES

What’s the costs?

To become PCI complaint, the fees depend on the size of business, plus other factors like your existing technology and security. But if you’re non-complaint, this can result in fines, data breaches, costly forensic audits, card replacement fees and more.

How do you become PCI compliant?

Your payment processors and gateway provider may help you to become PCI compliant. Paynetworx offers support in becoming compliant and how to maintain compliance.

Call us on 01245 330720 to find out more.

All E-commerce payments use 3D secure, which is a popular fraud prevention method. It's an additional verification site to prove you are the card owner when paying with your card online.

Originally it was rolled out by Visa in the early 2000's but it’s now been adopted by many of the high street banks.

So what is 3D secure?

It stands for 3 Domain Secure which includes the 3 parties involved in processing a secure transaction. These are: the vendor, your bank, the payment scheme; Visa, Mastercard, or Amex.

When you buy a product online, you'll be redirected to a payment gateway to complete your purchase. Here you may have to enter a password / code you use for online banking, or an authorisation code sent to your mobile / email / online banking app.

To find out how to get started with E-commerce, call us on 01245 330720.

Have you ever taken a payment on your terminal before with a customer on the phone, and clicked CNP? This means the cardholder was not there at the time of the payment, but more importantly, without the customer there, you’re now liable for the transaction.

Card payments are always protected with face-to-face transactions but not when they’re not in store.

So what’s the solution?

If you are unable to have the customer do the payment in person, you may want to think about a virtual terminal. These use online checks to make sure the customer is present, so the transaction is secure for both the customer & you as a business.

To find out more about Virtual Terminals, click here (hyperlink to VT page)

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